Last week I asked users from primary care to rate a series of new articles added to Trip.  We asked them to let us know which of 12 articles they thought looked interesting/important.  With 342 votes the results are in:

  1. Systematic literature review on effectiveness of self-management support interventions in patients with chronic conditions and low socio-economic status. EvidenceUpdate
  2. Shared decision making in primary care can reduce antibiotic prescribing. NIHR Dissemination Centre
  3. Multimorbidity and polypharmacy. NICE, advice
  4. Extended hours in primary care linked to reductions in minor A&E attendances. NIHR Dissemination Centre
  5. Antimicrobial stewardship: changing risk-related behaviours in the general population. NICE, Clinical Guideline
  6. Capsaicin 8% Patch in Painful Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study. EvidenceUpdates
  7. Support at Home: Interventions to Enhance Life in Dementia (SHIELD) evidence, development and evaluation of complex interventions. NIHR HTA
  8. Randomised controlled trial and economic analysis of an internet-based weight management programme: POWeR+ (Positive Online Weight Reduction). NIHR HTA
  9. Cutaneous melanoma. SIGN Guideline
  10. Nitric oxide breath analysis for the management of asthma. HTA Database
  11. Long-Term Continuous Ambulatory ECG Monitors and External Cardiac Loop Recorders for Cardiac Arrhythmia. Health Quality Ontario
  12. Canadian Youth Perceptions on Cannabis. Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse

Presented graphically:

Systematic literature review on effectiveness of self-management support interventions in patients with chronic conditions and low socio-economic status won by a single vote.

What was most interesting to me was that it still only obtained 13% of the votes (while those towards the bottom received only 4%).  So, only around 1 in 8 people voted for it.  I was expecting higher scores.  Perhaps that’s a reflection on the diversity of primary care and the diversity of our users.  Perhaps one to test in a different speciality!

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